Tags: Tutorials

Air, Android, and cookies

What: In using an Android app, I need to send an authentication request (username/password) to the server and the server needs to send me back a cookie.  We all know how you would use JavaScript to grab cookie/session data and then you could send it right into flash. Problem: How or where would you find cookie being sent to you in your Air/Android app that uses no browser? Solution:  Headers can be found in the HTTPStatusEvent object!  Hurray!  It took me way too long to find the answer to this issue.  Everyone on google is happy to tell you “Hey there’s a manageCookies setting on the URLRequest object!”  Great, how do you find the damn headers?  In fact, as you’ll see in the following code, you dont even need to mess with that manageCookies setting.  I set it to true and got headers.  I set it to false and god headers.  I didn’t include it at all and got headers.  Sweet.

Read More…
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Image GPS Extractor Android App

I just wrapped up my first little Android App using Adobe AIR.  As far as development goes, that was one of the smoothest experiences I’ve ever had. I’m currently developing a mobile app for a project at work.  I’ve never created a mobile app before, and the project app is going to take a few weeks of solid work to complete.  I wanted to see the whole process from dev to release of a mobile app much sooner…. like, now.  So Friday I started writing classes and code that I’m going to need for the project at work, and that I could pull out of the project and use in a small tutorial project that I’m posting here.

Read More…

FishEyeMenu Class Update… v1.1

Thanks to a comment posted by doggy, I’ve updated the FishEyeMenu class to listen for MouseDown events and keep track of selected items.   New Functions: public function get selected():* public function get lastSelected():*  public function set selected( clickedItemEvent:MouseEvent ):void   New Event Type FishEyeMenu.SELECTED_CHANGED – Triggered upon a change in selected menu item Once you’ve pushed an item into the FishEyeMenu object, it keeps track of it’s own MouseDown events on the items in it’s array.  When a user clicks on a menu item, it sets the _lastSelected property to whatever Was selected, and sets the _currentSelected property to whatever menu item was clicked.   You can now add an event listener for SELECTED_CHANGED which will dispatch upon MouseDown on a menu item. Please note, the getters for selected and lastSelected are going to return the actual Object that you pushed to the menu.  So it will return a reference to the actual TextField or MovieClip or Sprite or whatever you’re using in the menu.  If you check the Example FLA, you’ll see this code as an example // in the main function fishEyeMenu.addEventListener( FishEyeMenu.SELECTED_CHANGED , changedHandler );   //later in the code: /** * Simple test of usage, fishEyeMenu.selected returns the object selected * so it's just like calling the actual object that was clicked last and * you can set whatever properties that object has. * If this were a MovieClip, you could use fishEyeMenu.selected.gotoAndStop() ***/ private function changedHandler( e:* ) { trace( "Selected Item Changed to : " + fishEyeMenu.selected.name ); trace( "Selected Item Changed to : " + fishEyeMenu.lastSelected.name ); fishEyeMenu.selected.x +=20; } In the simple example, calling fishEyeMenu.selected.x += 20; just moves the object you clicked over 20 pixels to the right (+20). But you could also use fishEyeMenu.selected.gotoAndStop( “Selected” ); if you had […]

Read More…

Preloader to Game Transition with Stop Propagation

This will be a quick post on some gotcha’s to keep an eye out for when loading your ActionScript 3 game swf from a preloader swf. Nothing revolutionary here, back in mid-December, I had posted a blog on ActionScript 3’s Event Handling and the stopPropagation method and just the other day working on the code for a new game project, I ran into a situation where I should’ve used the method, didn’t, and ran into some issues. Note: If you’re here looking for code on how to write a flash preloader, Lee Brimlow’s video tutorial on Preloading in AS3 gives a beautiful example. When I was originally learning how to code a preloader, that tutorial, and a couple of other tutorials around the net that escape my memory at the moment, were absolutely perfect.

Read More…

Fisheye Menu Using AS3 and TweenLite

A friend of mine that enjoys bitching until I help her with whatever popped into her head that moment messages me tonight.  “Hey for my site [that you’ll make for me for free because i’m a girl and your friend] I want a menu system like that one I showed you [which you’re supposed to magically remember out of all the sites you’ve seen on the whole internet in your life].” After she re-sent me the link, a beautiful site called ilovedust I took a look at the slick little fish-eye style menu and said, “Yeah that’s Animation, I do code.  Not pretty stuff like that.” After 5 minutes of receiving complaining message (but mostly once my game was finished that I was playing at Kongregate, I actually thought about what was happening in that menu, and after about 20 minutes of coding, had a workable menu.  I thought I’d post the code here and make a little tutorial out of it. I love TweenLite.  And TweenMax.  And pretty much everything at GreenSock.  Once you learn the class, it makes everything so easy.  For those that are here who are AS2 coders… a) Upgrade!  and b) They also have AS2 versions of all of their code.  There are a number of other Tween libraries to choose from. Some perform better than others.  But TweenLite was the first for me that ‘made sense’ in my budding AS3 days, which still continue. This is a quick little example of making a 5 menu-item menu that does stuff when you mouse-over.  You could probably think of a million ways to optimize this code; putting the menu items in a loop to initialize and things like that.  I’m just going to lay it out, and you can make your own better.

Read More…

Joomla and Languages: How to Actually Combine the Two

One of the most frustrating things about Joomla is it’s lack of thorough documentation.  Yeah, there’s an API… yeah there’s a Wiki… but it just seems like there are a  lot of gaps and holes that don’t necessarily have to exist. Here’s a quick tutorial on how to implement languages in your component in Joomla! 1.5. First off, lets talk about why this tutorial is important.  Let’s say you’re creating a component to give site admins a way to easily create a special Links (yes, there’s already one for Joomla, it’s 2am, just go with me on this) section.  On the back-end, you’ve got an “Add Link Category” page that takes admins to a nice form that lets them create a category for links in this component.  So you’ve got text for “Name:” and “Description:” and maybe even “Category Image:” if they want to use an image with the text.  You finish your component and release it, and someone in the Joomla community wants to make a Spanish version of your component.  They would have to dig into your source code and basically re-write all of your inline html that you’ve written; essentially necessitating a while new release of your component in an “English version” and “Spanish version.”

Read More…